Computing

POLIT Leaflet

The use of information and communication technology is an integral part of the national curriculum and is a key skill for everyday life. Computers, tablets, programmable robots, digital and video cameras are a few of the tools that can be used to acquire, organise, store, manipulate, interpret, communicate and present information. At Village Primary School we recognise that pupils are entitled to quality hardware and software and a structured and progressive approach to the learning of the skills needed to enable them to use it effectively.

All pupils are taught discreet ICT lessons from Early Years Foundation Stage to Year 6 following the Rising Stars ‘Switched On’ Scheme of work. This scheme ensures progression in the development of computing techniques and knowledge.

 

Aims

The school’s aims are to:

  • Provide a relevant, challenging and enjoyable curriculum for ICT and computing for all pupils.
  • Meet the requirements of the national curriculum programmes of study for ICT and computing.
  • Use ICT and computing as a tool to enhance learning throughout the curriculum.
  • To respond to new developments in technology.
  • To equip pupils with the confidence and capability to use ICT and computing throughout their later life.
  • To enhance learning in other areas of the curriculum using ICT and computing.
  • To develop the understanding of how to use ICT and computing safely and responsibly.

 

The national curriculum for computing aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • Can understand and apply the fundamental principles of computer science, including logic, algorithms, data representation, and communication
  • Can analyse problems in computational terms, and have repeated practical experience of writing computer programs in order to solve such problems
  • Can evaluate and apply information technology, including new or unfamiliar technologies, analytically to solve problems.
  • Are responsible, competent, confident and creative users of information and communication technology.

 

By the end of key stage 1 pupils should be taught to:

  • Understand what algorithms are, how they are implemented as programs on digital devices, and that programs execute by following a sequence of instructions
  • Write and test simple programs
  • Use logical reasoning to predict and computing the behaviour of simple programs
  • Organise, store, manipulate and retrieve data in a range of digital formats
  • Communicate safely and respectfully online, keeping personal information private, and recognise common uses of information technology beyond school.

 

By the end of key stage 2 pupils should be taught to:

  • Design and write programs that accomplish specific goals, including controlling or simulating physical systems; solve problems by decomposing them into smaller parts
  • Use sequence, selection, and repetition in programs; work with variables and various forms of input and output; generate appropriate inputs and predicted outputs to test programs
  • Use logical reasoning to explain how a simple algorithm works and to detect and correct errors in algorithms and programs
  • Understand computer networks including the internet; how they can provide multiple services, such as the world-wide web; and the opportunities they offer for communication and collaboration
  • Describe how internet search engines find and store data; use search engines effectively; be discerning in evaluating digital content; respect individuals and intellectual property; use technology responsibly, securely and safely

Select, use and combine a variety of software (including internet services) on a range of digital devices to accomplish given goals, including collecting, analysing, evaluating and presenting data and information.

 

Vision

In this technological age where computers are an integral aspect of our modern lives our main aim is to ensure that children are safe users of technology. At Village Primary we want to raise safe and healthy children who are mindful, active producers of technology not mindless consumers. Children need to know how to navigate the online world safely, maturely and sensitively; ensuring they use their critical, ‘computational thinking’ skills when presented with a range of views and information that will enable them to participate effectively and safely in a digital world.

Technology is rapidly changing at an inordinate and incomprehensible speed. As the famous quote from Richard Riley (former US Secretary of Education) says “We are preparing children for jobs that have not yet been invented, in order to solve problems we don’t even know are problems yet.” We recognise that as a school we have a responsibility to prepare the pupils for this uncertain future by improving their knowledge of and understanding how imperative technology is as an aid to learning and the real world beyond.

We aim to ensure that children are active, resilient users of technology and teachers use ‘unplugged’ activities to ensure children have a deeper concrete understanding of the curriculum before moving onto the abstract. Where possible technology is used to enhance areas of the curriculum but staff and children are aware of ensuring technology is not just used for the sake of it and has a real purpose and enrichment. Creative and imaginative cross curricular teaching aims to give children the flexibility to explore, dream and discover in real life and purposeful contexts. Through the study of computing, children are able to develop a wide range of essential skills, knowledge and understanding that they will need for the rest of their lives.

 

Computing – Curriculum Map

  Autumn 1 Autumn 2 Spring 1 Spring 2 Summer 1 Summer 2
Year 1

Using Programmable Toys

 

Making videos of instructions

Creating an eBook

 

Finding Images using the web

Creating a talking book

 

Creating a digital card

 

Year 2

Programming (on screen)

 

Exploring how computer games work

 

Taking photographs

 

Researching a topic

 

Emailing

 

Collecting data

 

Skills
KS1

 ·         use technology safely and respectfully, keeping personal information private; identifying where to go for help and support when they have concerns about content or contact on the internet or other online technology*

·         understand what algorithms are, how they are implemented as programs on digital devices, and that programs execute by following precise and unambiguous instructions

·         create and debug simple programs

·         use logical reasoning to predict the behaviour of simple programs

·         use technology purposefully to create, organise, store, manipulate and retrieve digital content

·         recognise common uses of information technology beyond school

Year 3

Programming an animation

 

Finding and correcting bugs in programs

 

Video performance

 

Exploring computer networks, including the internet

Communicating safely on the internet (email)

 

Collecting and analysing data

 

Year 4 Developing a simple educational game Interactive toys Producing digital music Editing and writing HTML Producing a wiki Presenting Data
Year 5 Developing and interactive game Cracking codes Art and Patterns Creating a website Blogging 3D modelling
Year 6 Planning an app Developing project management skills Researching the app market Designing and interface for an app Designing a simple mobile phone app Creating video and web copy
Skills
KS2

·         use technology safely, respectfully and responsibly; recognise acceptable/unacceptable behaviour; identify aa range of ways to report concerns about content and contact*

·         design, write and debug programs that accomplish specific goals, including controlling or simulating physical systems; solve problems by decomposing them into smaller parts

·         use sequence, selection, and repetition in programs; work with variables and various forms of input and output

·         use logical reasoning to explain how some simple algorithms work and detect and correct errors in algorithms and programs

·         understand computer networks, including the internet; how they can provide multiple services, such as the World Wide Web, and the opportunities they offer for communication and collaboration

·         use search technologies effectively, appreciate how results are selected and ranked, and be discerning in evaluating digital content

·         select, use and combine a variety of software (including internet services) on a range of digital devices to design and create a range of programs, systems and content that accomplish given goals, including collecting, analysing, evaluation and presenting data and information